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Once you accept money, you have to give something UP Law Of Exchange

Right now what I’d like to do is I’d like to talk about the law of exchange.

See, one of the things that people don’t understand is that once you accept money, usually there’s something you’re going to have to give. You’re going to have to either give up or create, generate something. The law of exchange is that I give you something, and you give me something. So, when someone offers you money, you need to be very clear what it is that you are going to be giving to them. Is it going to be your time? Is it going to be part of your business? Is it going to be your body? Is it going to be part of your life? Is it going to be your reputation, your integrity, your contacts, your health? What is it that you’re going to be giving to someone when they offer you money?

Now, this sounds a little bit crazy, but it comes up a lot, and I’m particularly talking to young people that haven’t been around enough to understand that there’s always an exchange. When I was little, that was one of the biggest lessons that my mother taught me, which is when somebody offers you something for free, there’s no such thing as free. The love of your mother or your father or your family and friends that have gone through a lot with you, business associates and employees and people in your circles that have already shown to be trusted? Yes. Probably there is already the exchange has been established. But when you see an advertisement, when somebody approaches you, and when it looks like that all of a sudden you’re going to have this free something, no. There is no such thing. There’s always an exchange.

You can handle it very elegantly. You can say, “Well, just let me know, what am I going to have to give up? What would you like from me? What is it that you want from me?” because there’s no such thing as free. I actually say that. I actually say that to people, and then we kind of have established kind of like, okay, this is where we’re working from, this is how we’re understanding. And I’m happy, happy, happy to give people things. I’m happy to give them my time, give them my money and give them something. What is going to be the exchange? And vice versa. One of the greatest lessons I learned from my Mamacita.

I remember seeing advertisements, “Order this and you will get this for free, and you will get this for free,” actually yes and no. Yes, I am going to get something for free, but what are they getting from me? They’re just getting me to buy as soon as possible, which is fine but don’t believe that there’s such a thing as free. I think that once you have that understanding your life is going to change radically. You are absolutely going to have a new understanding of marketing, and you’re going to have a new understanding of some people that maybe don’t have your highest good in mind, which actually ultimately you are 100% responsible for. Just remember that. Whenever I have met people that felt like they have been robbed or they’ve been ripped off or something has gone wrong, when we really dissect the situation, we find that they were a little bit naïve and really, really believed some of the great lines that were given to them.

So, once you understand that there’s nothing for free, that there’s always an exchange, life is going to get a little bit easier for you.

Offering me MONEY is not the way to work with me

We’re moving into a world where Social Enterprises and Social Entrepreneurs are populating the world of business more and more.

One of the shifts that’s happening is that we are moving away from the traditional way of doing business. Socially-responsible entrepreneurs like myself cannot be enticed by how much money we’re going to make in a business deal. We care more about it being in alignment with our purpose. Of course, we care about the bottom line, but you can’t get entrepreneurs like myself and other leaders to get very excited about working with you if you are just offering us money.

I get offered money to do all kinds of opportunities — and money is not the reason why I get interested in projects. Socially-conscious leaders like myself need there to be an alignment of purpose. We need to be very clear on how the results will be achieved, what the Rules of the Game are going to be, how we’re going to participate together, how we’re going to be working with each other, and how will it be in alignment with the highest purpose for everyone involved…

So be sure when you are approaching people to either invest with you or to work with you or to be part of a project that you’re creating, that you begin with the purpose. My purpose is to uplift humanity’s consciousness through socially-responsible businesses.

To that end, one of my missions is to transform educational systems around the world and eradicate poverty and hunger. Another is the Greening of the world.

So when you approach someone like me, a Social Entrepreneur, that you would like to work with, and they have something that you may be interested in – such as access to their network or their knowledge, or how they think, or for them to introduce you to people that you wish that you could work with and be able to participate in life with — then you have to do some research. You have to do some homework, you have to take a look and see if that person would be interested in doing your project and be part of your business that will add value to humanity. In other words, do your missions match?

So, the days of offering people money only, are over. Yes, there’s still a lot of people out there who are just about the bottom line – money, money, money – but then you have to consider what it would be like to work with a person like that. If the bottom line is all about money, then values and the way that people are treated, the way that businesses are run and the way that conflicts are resolved, will take a backseat. When we think we can buy people or solve all of our problems with money, just remember that money only solves one kind of problem: money problems.

Later, as you get more and more money, you have different kinds of problems, what I call “rich people problems”. So problems don’t go away with money, only money problems go away. You still have to handle many other challenges in life. I hope that makes it clear of why you can’t buy people like myself with money!

 

Tips to Overcoming your Personal Financial Crisis

Would you like to know the secret to overcoming your personal financial crisis?

How would your life be different when you no longer “worry” about where your cash will come from?

DC Cordova has assembled a list of 10 distinctions she’s learned from her own personal path, distinctions that have served her well through many years of entrepreneurship and business development. From the upcoming book, Walking With the Wise: Overcoming Obstacles, this excerpt includes some of the most powerful habits of surviving difficult financial times. Read more

The Illusion Of Money

Most people think that wealth is only a matter of money; they overlook other resources.

Money is just part of wealth. We like it because it is an objective measurement, making it easy to draw conclusions and evaluate alternatives. The most valuable resource we have is our time, not our money. It is the only limiting factor, and we never know when it will cease to exist.

Money is an illusion.

Read more

Why I Am Optimistic About the Future

As the world continues to face monumental challenges, I thought this article would inspire you to face things a little differently…

it’s just what we need to hear today.

By: John Mauldin

I am optimistic by nature. An entrepreneur friend of mine gave me a term that I have grown to love. She calls it “psychic income.” It’s that bit of hoped-for future income that is in our minds, that drives some of us, inflicted with the entrepreneurial gene, to do the next deal, make the next big plan, scheme yet another scheme to finally hit whatever counts as the big one for each of us. How much better would our life be, how our problems would go away, if only this one thing would come about! It has not yet become real income, yet we live and act as if it is almost real. We can feel it getting ready to happen. It is still in our heads, this psychic income. Yet it is in some ways real for us. Read more

The Illusion Of Money

money and wealth

Most people think that wealth is only a matter of money; they overlook other resources.

Money is just part of wealth. We like it because it is an objective measurement, making it easy to draw conclusions and evaluate alternatives. The most valuable resource we have is our time, not our money. It is the only limiting factor, and we never know when it will cease to exist.

Money is an illusion.

We may think we like money, but what we really like is what we can do with money. Intuitively, we prefer to think more about wealth than about money, because we know that wealth is a far wider concept. Money is a way of keeping score, mainly because we live in a society where money has become an objective measurement. Rich people have a lot of money; wealthy people have a positive flow of resources. The real measure of wealth is the flow of resources. When we think about resources instead of money we create and discover new opportunities. It is what we expect to do with money that empowers us to have more.

There are many hidden costs and benefits that can help us balance the flow of resources in a way that works best for us. When we realize that our circumstances play a role in our wealth, we begin to look at money in a more practical way. When we limit our thoughts to money alone, we fail to see how we can creatively use the other resources we might have available, such as friendships, time, knowledge, and other assets.

The vaccine to measuring wealth with money is to value our joyful time. Wealthy people don’t have more money. They have enough because they don’t feel the need to have more. Our most limiting factor in life is time, not wealth. When we learn to balance our lives in ways that give us time to enjoy, to learn, to help others, we are wealthy. When we realize that we can have a great time without spending money, money becomes secondary to happiness. When we become aware that we are needed and set aside time to volunteer for a cause that is meaningful to us, we realize how wealthy we really are.

Wealthy people don’t “need” money; instead they attract it. It’s not that they want to be poor or think that living with less money is spiritual in any way.

Wealthy people have broken the ties between success and money and wealth and money. Success is being able to do what you are absolutely passionate about doing; being wealthy is having more resources than you need because you created them.

Assets don’t measure wealth; value does.

After years of helping CEOs and investors, Alicia Castillo Holley realized that invisible barriers were preventing successful people from becoming wealthy. Her “Ten Unwealthy Habits” became an instant hit on the revolutionary site “Change This”. Now available on amazon. Bulk purchases and more info at http://www.thetenunwealthyhabits.com

Tips to Overcoming your Personal Financial Crisis

overcome challenges

Would you like to know the secret to overcoming your personal financial crisis?

How would your life be different when you no longer “worry” about where your cash will come from?

DC Cordova has assembled a list of 10 distinctions she’s learned from her own personal path, distinctions that have served her well through many years of entrepreneurship and business development.  From the upcoming book, Walking With the Wise: Overcoming Obstacles, this excerpt includes some of the most powerful habits of surviving difficult financial times.

1. Know that this is about YOU. It’s not about the economy. There are many people making money when others are not.

2. Determine what you are good at and what will bring you money now. Not later – now! Don’t worry about the tasks. Some of us had to roll up our sleeves and do jobs we had paid others to do for many years.

3. Focus on income generating activities. Let go of all those things that waste your time and don’t bring in the cash flow that you need.

4. Tighten up your belt. No new clothes, cars, or any other doodas that are not going to create money for you. You now spend money only on those things that will make you more money.

5. When you’re done with your personal financial crisis, keep your agreements and pay everyone back. If you cannot do that for years, create new agreements as necessary.

6. Do a good transformational program that will “kick-start” you in making new decisions and creating new references for yourself.

7. Surround yourself with loving and supportive people – particularly a good mentor – who will tell you the truth and give you good feedback to accelerate your progress towards getting back on your feet.

8. Do something once a day and one day a week that brings you pleasure. Exercise, ride your bicycle, spend time with your loved ones, watch your favorite program, read a novel… This is crucial to keep your spirits up.

9. Don’t make yourself wrong – forgive yourself for things that you think you could have done differently.

10. Keep taking action… Your life will turn around!

7 Powerful Principles Entrepreneurs Live By

entreprenuer principals

7 Powerful Principles Entrepreneurs Live By

by DC Cordova

In my program, Money & You®, we teach entrepreneurs, business professionals, salespeople, doctors, attorneys, alternative health care providers, engineers, scientists, writers, networking professionals, business owners, and many wealth gurus – you name them, we’ve taught them – how to live a principle-filled life based on the teachings of R. Buckminster Fuller, W. Edwards Deming, Georgi Lozanov, and many other pioneers of new thinking.

The creators of Money & You® are Bobbi DePorter and Marshall Thurber who, in the mid-1970’s, pioneered a never-before-seen Business School for Entrepreneurs that lasted six weeks!

The reasons why six weeks was a breakthrough – and continues to be – is because there wasn’t and still isn’t a school anything like it. They called it the Burklyn Business School for Entrepreneurs and it was first offered in Vermont in 1978. Later that year, they created Money & You®, designed to be five days that incorporated left-and-right-brain teaching techniques extensively researched in the post-war era economic expansion. It’s actually quite fun! If you like music, games, color and experiencing rather than sitting in a classroom, you’ll get it.

We’ve took our teaching and learning technology global, and now it is offered in North America, Australia, Singapore, Malaysia, Taiwan, Hong Kong and throughout China.

So, with that background on what Money & You® is, I’d like to share 7 POWERFUL Principles to live by (every successful entrepreneur I know lives by these principles).

  1. The Universe Will Not Deny You Anything. Only You Can Do That. -G.S.
    This is one of the most powerful principles I have learned and we teach. R. Buckminster Fuller referred to God as the Native Americans did – Great Spirit or G.S. For some of you this is easy – everything you have in your life right now – every relationship, money in the bank, your cars, pets, where you live, your attitude, your free time, your fulfillment – is completely what you’ve chosen! The Universe is abundant and there is only ONE PERSON who can deny you ANYTHING! YOU! Get this one and you’ll create freedom.
  2. Thinking Is the Hardest Thing You Can Do. That’s Why So Few People Engage In It. -Henry Ford
    Think about this one… When have you stopped yourself because it got “hard” to find the solution? Realize that you will be compensated in direct proportion to the size of the solution you solve.
  3. Integrity Is The Essence Of Everything (Successful). -R. Buckminster Fuller
    The human spirit has complete integrity. When you are out of touch with yourself, you may take some actions that are not congruent with what you know to be best. So, basically, integrity is something that “holds it’s own shape.” Take a look around you and see if there are things that are not working for you. And are you in complete integrity with yourself?
  4. 94% Of Problems Are System Based. Look To The System To Correct. -W. Edwards Deming
    W. Edwards Deming is known as the father of Quality Control. He is the reason why Toyota is known for quality. If the results in your business continue to suffer, the systems you have aren’t producing  your desired results. As they say in the computer world, “Garbage in, garbage out!” Well, with a bad system that’s not always true. You can have gold going in and garbage coming out. One of the co-creators of M&Y, Marshall Thurber, was an avid student of W. Edwards Deming. For more information on his work go to http://www.positivedeviants.com
  5. Clarity Leads To Power.
    As they used to say in the G.I. Joe cartoon, “Knowing’s half the battle!” When you are clear on your goals, your values, your mission – everything will begin to fall in place. It’s the decision in knowing what you want that sets you on the path. The “how” of making your goals come true will appear in miraculous moments.
  6. The Most Powerful Force I Have Is What I Say To Myself AND What I Believe.
    Your words create. Buckminster Fuller said, “Words are your most powerful tool.” Other teachers of ours share that we create with our words. And science is now validating that our thoughts are also physically affect the condition of our cells.
  7. There Are No Victims. Only Volunteers.
    Responsibility is removing all blame, shame and justification. When you take responsibility for the results you have, you truly learn the value in the learning experiences throughout your life. What do all those experiences have in common? You.

Creative Commons License photo credit: mborowick

First I Must Change

Change for the better - Money & Me

One of the core principles of Money & You is that “the key to making money is directly proportional to one’s ability to generate and maintain good relationships – both with oneself and with others.

This self-knowledge is learned and experienced through many different activities throughout the program because it is such a key pre-requisite to long-term success in any business.

One of the mantras underlying its basic philosophy is “for things to change, first I must change”.

Money & You teaches people to feel okay about making mistakes – to recognize them as learning experiences. Graduates learn ways to apply many of the principles taught in the program to their businesses and their lives. They gain wisdom daily and thereby become more and more successful as the distinctions seen in the program become part of their daily reality.

Many of our graduates are world-famous men and women. Others, not so famous, are making a difference in their own communities and industries. Many have started organizations that teach the principles they found so powerful at their own Money & You program. We love the ripple effect that our work provides and we love teaching this curriculum.

Are you ready for a change? Click here to find out more about Money & You.

(Also registered for the Money & Me® Teleclass.

Creative Commons License photo credit: Ralph Buckley

Waves Of Change

The wave of changes ahead

A second article from John Maudlin that we’d like to share..

The Millennium Wave

By: John Mauldin

Let’s look at some changes we are likely to see over the next few decades. My view is that we have a number of waves of change getting ready to erupt on the world stage. The combination of them is what I call the Millennium Wave, the most significant period of change in human history. And one for which most of us are not yet ready.

Some time next year, we are going to see the three-billionth person get access to the telecosm (phones and internet, etc.). By 2015 it will be five billion people. Within ten years, most of the world will be able to access cheap (I mean really cheap) high-speed wireless broadband at connection rates that dwarf what we now have.

That is going to unleash a wave of creativity and new business that will be staggering. That heretofore hidden genius in Mumbai or Vladivostok or Kisangani will now have the ability to bring his ideas, talent, and energy to change the world in ways we can hardly imagine. When Isaac Watts was inventing the steam engine, there were a handful of engineers who could work with him. Now we throw a staggering number of scientists and engineers at trivial problems, let alone the really big ones.

And because of the internet, the advances of one person soon become known and built upon in a giant dance of collaboration. It is because of this giant dance, this unplanned group effort, that we will all figure out how to make advances in so many ways. (Of course, that is hugely disruptive to businesses that don’t adapt.)

Ever-faster change is what is happening in medicine. None of us in 2030 will want to go back to 2010, which will then seem as barbaric and antiquated as, say, 1975. Within a few years, it will be hard to keep up with the number of human trials of gene therapy and stem cell research. Sadly for the US, most of the tests will be done outside of our borders, but we will still benefit from the results.

I spend some spare study time on stem cell research. It fascinates me. We are now very close to being able to start with your skin cells and grow you a new liver (or whatever). Muscular dystrophy? There are reasons to be very encouraged.

Alzheimer’s disease requires somewhere between 5-7% of total US health-care costs. Defeat that and a large part of our health-care budget is fixed. And it will be first stopped and then cured. Same thing with cancers and all sorts of inflammatory diseases. There is reason to think a company may have found a generic cure for the common flu virus.

A whole new industry is getting ready to be born. And with it new jobs and investment opportunities.

Energy problems? Are we running out of oil? My bet is that in less than 20 years we won’t care. We will be driving electric cars that are far superior to what we have today in every way, from power sources that are not oil-based.

For whatever reason, I seem to run into people who are working on new forms of energy. They are literally working in their garages on novel new ways to produce electric power; and my venture-capital MIT PhD friend says they are for real when I introduce them. And if I know of a handful, there are undoubtably thousands of such people. Not to mention well-funded corporations and startups looking to be the next new thing. Will one or more make it? My bet is that more than one will. We will find ourselves with whole new industries as we rebuild our power grids, not to mention what this will mean for the emerging markets.

What about nanotech? Robotics? Artificial intelligence? Virtual reality? There are whole new industries that are waiting to be born. In 1980 there were few who saw the rise of personal computers, and even fewer who envisioned the internet. Mapping the human genome? Which we can now do for an individual for a few thousand dollars? There are hundreds of new businesses that couldn’t even exist just 20 years ago.

I am not sure where the new jobs will come from, but they will. Just as they did in 1975.

There is, however, one more reason I am optimistic. Sitting around the dinner table, I looked at my kids. I have seven kids, five of whom are adopted. I have two Korean twins, two black kids, a blond, a (sometimes) brunette, and a redhead. They range in age from 15 to 32. It is a rather unique family. My oldest black son is married to a white girl and my middle white son is with a black girl. They both have given me grandsons this year (shades of Obama!). One of my Korean daughters is married to a white young man, and the other is dating an Hispanic. And the oldest (Tiffani) is due with my first granddaughter in less than a month.

And the interesting thing? None of them think any of that is unusual. They accept it as normal. And when I am with their friends, they also see the world in a far different manner than my generation. (That is not to say the trash talk cannot get rather rough at the Mauldin household at times.)

I find great cause for optimism in that. I am not saying we are in a post-racial world. We are not. Every white man in America should have a black son. It would open your eyes to a world we do not normally see. But it is better, far better, than the world I grew up in. And it is getting still better.

My boys play online video games with kids from all over the world. And the kids from around the world get on the internet and see a much wider world than just their local neighborhoods.

Twenty years ago China was seen as a huge military threat. Now we are worried about them not buying our bonds and becoming an economic power. Niall Ferguson writes about “Chimerica” as two countries joined together in an increasingly tight bond. In 20 years, will Iran be our new best friend? I think it might be, and in much less time than that, as an increasingly young and frustrated population demands change, just as they did 30 years ago. Will it be a smooth transition? Highly unlikely. But it will happen, I think.

I look at my kids and their friends. Are they struggling? Sure. They can’t get enough hours, enough salaries, the jobs they want. They now have kids and mortgages. And dreams. Lots of dreams. That is cause for great optimism. It is when the dreams die that it is time to turn pessimistic.

I believe the world of my kids is going to be a far better world in 20 years. Will China and the emerging world be relatively better off? Probably, but who cares? Do I really begrudge the fact that someone is making their part of the world better? In absolute terms, none of my kids will want to come back to 2009, and neither will I. Most of the doom and gloom types (and they seem to be legion) project a straight-line linear future. They see no progress beyond that in their own small worlds. If you go back to 1975 and assume a linear future, the projections were not all that good. Today you can easily come up with a less-than-rosy future if you make the assumption that things in 20 years will roughly look the same as now. But that also assumes there will not be even more billions of people who now have the opportunity to dream up their own psychic income and work to make it happen.

We live in a world of accelerating change. Things are changing at an ever-increasing pace. The world is not linear, it is curved. And we may be at the beginning of the elbow of that curve. If you assume a linear world, you are going to make less-than-optimal choices about your future, whether it is in your job or investments or life in general.

In the end, life is what you make of it. With all our struggles, as we sat around the table, our family was content, just like 100 million families around the country. Are there those who are in dire distress? Homeless? Sick? Of course, and that is tragic for each of them. And those of us who are fortunate need to help those who are not.

We live in the most exciting times in human history. We are on the verge of remarkable changes in so many areas of our world. Yes, some of them are not going to be fun. I see the problems probably more clearly than most.

But am I going to just stop and say, “What’s the use? The Fed is going to make a mess of things. The government is going to run us into debts to big too deal with? We are all getting older, and the stock market is going to crash?”

Even the most diehard bear among us is thinking of ways to improve his personal lot, even if it is only to buy more gold and guns. We all think we can figure it out or at least try to do so. Some of us will get it right and others sadly will not. But it is the collective individual struggles for our own versions of psychic income, the dance of massive collaboration on a scale the world has never witnessed, that will make our world a better place in the next 20 years.

All that being said, while I am an optimist, I am a cautious and hopefully realistic optimist. I do not think the stock market compounds at 10% a year from today’s valuations. I rather doubt the Fed will figure the exact and perfect path in removing its quantitative easing. I doubt we will pursue a path of rational fiscal discipline in 2010 or sadly even by 2012, although I pray we do. I expect my taxes to be much higher in a few years.

But thankfully, I am not limited to only investing in the broad stock market. I have choices. I can be patient and wait for valuations to come my way. I can look for new opportunities. I can plan to make the tax burden as efficient as possible, and try and insulate myself from the volatility that is almost surely in our future – and maybe even figure out a way to prosper from it.

A pessimist never gets in the game. A wild-eyed optimist will suffer the slings and arrows of boom and inevitable bust. Cautious optimism is the correct and most rewarding path. And that, I hope, is what you see when you read my weekly thoughts.

You can read more of John’s article here.

John Mauldin is a multiple NYT Best Selling author and recognized financial expert. He has been heard on CNBC, Bloomberg and many radio shows across the country. He is the editor of the highly acclaimed, free weekly economic and investment e-letter that goes to over 1 million subscribers each week. You can sign up here.

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